#011 HOW TO CHECK FOR ACCURACY OF MEDICAL INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET

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Last updated on May 5, 2021

In our last two posts, we mentioned how some websites might be more medically accurate than others.   Of course, you should scrutinize just about every website, but probably the ones that you need to most worry about are ones that end in .COM, .NET, .INFO, and so on. The information on there might not be coming from reliable sources.  What are two of the ways that you can check these websites for medical accuracy?

First,  you might want to pay attention to the author. Who wrote the post?  . Is the article written by someone who is a registered dietician, who is a doctor, who is an advanced medical practitioner, or who is a established researcher in the field? Speaking in generalities, that information may carry a higher level of accuracy.

Second, try to figure out the following.  When was the article written?  Some things are advancing slower than others but as a whole,  research in medicine is advancing at a more rapid pace than it was a century ago. In addition, medical information that is 5 or 10 years old MIGHT already be outdated. It truly depends. However, as a rule of thumb, I like to look at more recent articles.

Here you are! You now have some idea of where you can get your medical information. This is not a fail proof formula as I can't predict which website you will wind up reading and what you will find. Plus, even if you had ALL of the most accurate information in the world, which is probably hard to find, you would still run into a problem. Even if you look at information from lots and lots of reliable sources, having that information doesn't necessarily mean that the information you have gathered will translate into insight.

Hope this helps you when you are next looking at a website for medical accuracy. 

Three "legal" things:  First, either a male or a female could consider themselves to be a mother.  My job is to serve and not to judge.  Second, although I am a family physician, I am not your doctor or therapist.   Please see your and your child's doctor.  Third, the information presented here is for educational purposes only.  It does not constitute professional medical advice. 

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